Should You Worry About a CDR?

Should You Worry About a CDR?

If you receive notification from the Social Security Administration (SSA) telling you that your case is being audited or reviewed, it may be a rather upsetting experience. After all, you may have expended a great deal of time and effort collecting all of your medical records during your initial application for benefits. Not only this, you may have waited months – or even years – and participated in a number of formal and informal hearings and meetings before your application was approved. To hear that the SSA is now reviewing your case may cause you to wonder, “What is the SSA looking for?  Will I have to reapply for benefits or start the process over again?”

What is a Continuing Disability Review (CDR)?

It may be comforting to know that it is quite common for those who receive Social Security disability benefits to have their cases reviewed by the SSA. This is, in fact, a routine procedure. When a person initially receives Social Security disability benefits, he or she should receive a notification from the SSA indicating when he or she can expect the SSA to review his or her case. This review of a person’s case and benefits is sometimes called a continuing disability review. Usually, if the person receiving benefits is young and/or is receiving benefits because of a condition that the SSA expects to improve, a review will be set about three years after that person first begins to receive benefits. Conversely, if the person is older (typically over 55 years old) and/or is receiving benefits because of a condition that is not likely to improve with time, a review may be set in as many as seven years. In either case, the purpose of a continuing disability review (as its name implies) is to allow the SSA an opportunity to see if a person’s Social Security disability benefits should continue or should be terminated.

Should I Worry About a CDR?

Some estimates indicate that only about 5% of Social Security disability recipients have their benefits terminated after a CDR. A recipient of benefits is not required to prove they continue to be eligible for benefits during a CDR; rather, in order to terminate a person’s benefits, the SSA must have evidence that your medical condition has become less severe. In other words, your residual functional capacity (RFC – what you are able to do even with your condition) must have improved from when you were initially granted benefits. Not only this, but even if your condition and RFC have improved, the SSA must prove that there is now full-time work you are capable of performing.

Contact the Klok Law Firm, LLC for Help

At the Klok Law Firm, LLC, our experienced Social Security disability attorneys are committed to not only helping you obtain the benefits you deserve but to helping you keep those benefits. If you have been notified that your case is about to be reviewed, we can help you understand the process and answer your questions. Contact us for assistance at (843) 216-8860.

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